Hacker Group Steals Millions of Apple Device ID’s

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AntiSec, short for anti-security, claims they stole 12 million Apple iOS device Unique Device Identifiers (UDIDs) by breaching FBI security. The group released a million of them on a website. AntiSec alleges they had a computer belonging to a FBI agent to gain access “to a file containing the list of the Apple IDs”. The online posting “did not identify the agent or who the ID numbers belonged to.” [1]

AntiSec said that they chose to only “release a portion of the Apple IDs list to get people’s attention to its claims that the FBI is gathering people’s Apple device details.” In the note that AntiSec posted online, AntiSec said they have learned that people do not pay attention when one says, “hey, FBI is using your device detail.” The AntiSec group claims that a portion of the devices on the list contains names, telephone numbers, addresses, and ZIP codes, but they chose to only reveal Continue reading Hacker Group Steals Millions of Apple Device ID’s

How secure are your passwords?

Mashable’s article titled “38% of us Would Rather Clean a Toilet Than Think of New Password” reports that login credentials and site authentications are a hassle for many people.  In a recent Harris Interactive poll, “some 38% of us think attempting to solve world peace would be a more manageable task than trying to deal with yet another set of login credentials.”  All of this hassle makes it easier for hackers to gain access to our online accounts because we tend to either use to same passwords for multiple accounts or we forget our passwords. [1]

I find it difficult to create and remember every password for every online account that I have.  For each site that I visit, there are different sets of password rules. The rules dictate how many Continue reading How secure are your passwords?

iOS 5.0.1 update bug fix

My wife has an iPhone 4s on the Verizon network. After I did an over the air (OTA) upgrade to 5.0.1, the phone would only show the phone number for the people that was texting and calling her (even though their contact information was still in the contact app).

Here is how I fixed the issue:

1) Open the Phone and dial *228. This is a Verizon over-the-air programming number.
2) When the system answers press 1 for “Program or activate your phone”
3) Wait for the call to disconnect. You should get a prompt stating something like, “Settings updated.”
4) Dial *228 again.
5) When the system answers press 2 for updating your roaming capabilities
6) Wait for the call to disconnect. You should get a prompt stating something like, “Settings updated.”
7) Open the Settings App.
8) In your mail and contact settings, delete the account(s) that you use to sync your contacts. This could be iCloud, Gmail (via Exchange), etc.
9) Open the Task Manager (double click the home button) and kill the open Applications by long tapping one of the icons. When the icons begin to shake, tap the red circle with the minus sign.
10) Turn off the iPhone. Then turn it back on.
11) Open the Settings App.
12) In your mail and contact settings, add back the account(s) that you deleted in step 8.
13) Wait a few minutes (3-5mins)
14) Open the Message App and Recent calls list to verify the fix.

Others have tried this fix:

1) Open the Settings App
2) Go to General > International > Language
3) Set the phone language to British English
4) Open the Task Manager (double click the home button) and kill the open Applications by long tapping one of the icons. When the icons begin to shake, tap the red circle with the minus sign.
5) Turn off the iPhone. Then turn it back on.
6) Open the Settings App
7) Go to General > International > Language
8) Set the phone back to US English

How to Make a Good Password and Protect It

A password needs to be unique.  A unique password is very important, because it is what keeps personal information secure.

Below are tips on how to create a secure password and keep bots from guessing your password.

– Be creative. Don’t use words that can be found in a dictionary.
– Use at least six characters.
– Don’t use a password that you have used elsewhere.
– Don’t use keyboard patterns (asdf) or sequential numbers (1234).
– Create an acronym. Don’t use a common one, like NASA or SCUBA. Don’t make your password solely an acronym, combine it with numbers and punctuation marks.
– Include punctuation marks. Mix capital and lowercase letters. Include numbers.
– Include similar looking substitutions, such as the number zero for the letter ‘O’ or $ for the letter ‘S’.
– Include phonetic replacements, such as ‘Luv 2 Laf’ for ‘Love to Laugh.’
– Don’t make your password all numbers, all uppercase letters, or all lowercase letters.
– Find ways of collecting random letters and numbers, such as opening books, looking at license plates or taking the third letter from the first ten words you see.
– Don’t use repeating characters (aa11).
– Don’t use a password that is listed as an example of how to pick a good password.

Tips for keeping your password secure:

– Never tell anyone your password. Don’t write it down.
Never send your password by email.
– Periodically change your password.

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